jQuery math finally solved

Web designers have long struggled with some of the more advanced aspects of computation and mathematics. Sometime ago, a Stack Overflow question asked

I’ve got a number in my JavaScript variable! Now how do I add another number to it? Please

A few well meaning answers point to using jQuery as the obvious solution. However, after a in depth search, I couldn’t find any actual jQuery plugins to do the calculations!

Well, there is a new jQuery plugin in town that aims to solve the problem of arithmetic in JavaScript: jMath!

It is incredibly easy to use in your code:

The plugin accepts the following operators:

  • ‘+’ (addition)
  • ‘-‘ (subtraction)
  • ‘*’ (multiplication)
  • ‘/’ (division)

And looking to add more in the future.

Hope that this helps in your development. Thanks!

Really Simple jQuery Tabs

Bugged by popular jQuery tab content rotators that a bulky, non semantic, to fast/slow, or can’t use custom HTML anywhere you want? Really Simple jQuery Tabs is a jQuery plugin that tries to address each one of those issues. It’s goal is to be as simple and flexible as possible. You can completely rip-out and replace the CSS with your own, changing elements position, styling, etc. It is quite small: at 844 bytes your bandwidth won’t know the difference!

And oh yeah: they rotate!

I have used several jQuery tab/content rotators/panels/things and, although each has been extensively developed and tested, am always left with the feeling that something is missing:

  • This one doesn’t let use put your own HTML in the tab-link
  • That one only supports images
  • The other one is 10,000 lines of code and you only use it once
  • This one cycles too fast/slow

The purpose of Really Simple jQuery Tabs is to be really simple and really flexible.

You can:

  • Add HTML to your semantically correct list item tab-links
  • Panes are regular DIVS – put images, text, AJAX loaded content, etc. up in that DIV
  • Specify (down to milliseconds) how fast to cycle, if you want to cycle at all
  • bonus feature: only 844 bytes!
  • Completely customize the CSS to affect layout, coloring, etc…

Before you get too far: Check out a simply -styled DEMO 

Or, see it in action at: weber.edu/getintoweber

Implement it like this:

And the markup looks like this:

Notice that semantic markup? Yeah, me too. It was written to be as flexible and extensible as possible.

Now download the source and do your thing!